Laser engineering to produce hydrophobic surfaces

TheEngineer has an article covering work by scientists at the University of Rochester who have achieved the surface modification of metals, by treatment with lasers, to make the surfaces hydrophilic or super-hydrophobic. In their study they used titanium, brass and platinum.

Bouncing water drops

Bouncing water drops from modified metal surface

Original paper: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/jap/117/3/10.1063/1.4905616

Advertisements

1 month’s free access to “Materials Science and Technology”

Maney publishing have made Materials Science and Technology to be their Journal of the month — if you sign up you can access the journal and back issues (from 1985 onwards) for the whole of November.

http://www.maneypublishing.com/index.php/journal-of-the-month-mst
We also have access to all the publications of the Royal Society for the whole of November Royal society celebrate open access week.

So the question is, which papers should we be reading from MST/ Phil Mag/ Proceedings of the Royal Society during November?

Adventures in Physical Metallurgy of Steels

During July 2013 I attended Adventures in Physical Metallurgy of Steels hosted by the Phase Transformations and Complex Properties research group of the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy.

The programme looked like this, videos are appearing on bhadeshia123’s channel on youtube (links). There is also a playlist available.

Programme
Introduction to Adventure. H. Bhadeshia

Architectured Steels, T. Koseki

Magneto-structural coupling. I. Abrikosov

Quench and partitioning. J. Speer

Crystallographic variant selection. S. Kundu

Secondary hardened bainite, J. R. Yang

Welding of high carbon steel, K. Fang

Isotropy and Fatigue: P. Ölund

Atoms in bainite, atomic mechanisms. F. Caballero

Pulsed steels, R. Qin

Fullerenes & buckyballs in steel: I. V. Shchetinin

Boron: Type IV cracking, F. Abe

Low-density steel, H-L. Yi

Friction stirring of steel, T. Debroy

Flash Processing, G. Cola

Reliable first principles calculations for iron: A. Paxton

Steels composites for energy applications, C. Capdevila-Montes

Microstructures without contact, C. Davis

Pop-in deformation, H. N. Han

Plausibility of fine bainite, C. García-Mateo

Reduced Activation, K. Wu

Architectured microstructures, G. Anand

Flash microstructure, S. Babu

Energetic TWIP, D. Dye

Mass production of fine bainite: A. Rose

Voids and 30000 atoms, S. Munetoh

Soft Particles, T. Tsuchiyama

Mechanochemistry, F. Miani

Simplex and Kappa steels, I. Gutierrez-Urrutia

Innoculated high-speed steel, A. Chaus

Non-cubic ferrite, D-W. Suh

Montage of events

Audi’s audacious aluminium advertising artifice

Audi’s advert for their A6 is really beautifully made…

Suppose you could make metal do anything you wanted,
use it in ways no one thought possible,
at Audi that’s what we do,
the new Audi A6 with Aluminium-hybrid body,
engineered for a lighter touch.

The way the metal forming is done in the advert is really nice, just shaping the parts by hand, just like the clay model can be formed when producing models of the car.

The technology is interesting, and challenging, a combination of aluminium and steel parts are used to make the car body. About 20% of aluminium by weight of the car body is aluminium, that means about 40% by volume. Non-load bearing parts such as body panels are aluminium (which benefit from good stiffness/weight ratio). All of the car body is made from cold formed and warm formed steels as in conventional car body. Interesting, aluminium sections seem to be present as side impact bars and bumper. From the advert you might be left with the impression that the whole body is aluminium, or that this is something that would be desirable, especially confusing since ‘hybrid’ is also now commonly used to refer to automobiles which use combinations of different power sources for the engine.

This video shows which parts of the car body are aluminium and steel.

However these cars overall are not much lighter due to the use of aluminium. From the previous model of A6 the weight saving is 30 kg, the weight if the total car is 1575 kg unladen or 2,155 kg gross weight (figures for 4 door 2.0 diesel). I want to look up the weight of Audio A6 since they are first introduced, that’s because in all cars there has been a trends towards increasing weight, despite all the advances in decreasing the weight of the car body.

Japanese Swords are medieval nanotechnology

During Japanese sword making the steel is folded repeatedly. Each time the steel is folded the structure is refined.

The folding is a key process in sword making. Folding and striking the metal forges the surfaces back together. This process of folding, then forge welding, can be repeated as many as 16 times. The process removes impurities and helps even out the carbon content, and controls the scale of chemical segregation, and it is this which results in alternating layers of hard and ductile material.

So how can folding the steel result in a nanoscale structure?

When the steel is folded the number of layers obviously increases geometrically. 1 fold result in 2 layers, 2 folds results in 22 = 4 layers, 3 folds results in 23 = 8 layers. By the time we get to 15 or 16 layers we have 32768 layers or 65536 layers. After that the sword is forged out to have a width of around half a centimetre.

5 mm divided by 65536 = 76 nm.
(5e-3/65536=7.629e-8)

So each layer is 76 nm. So we can legitimately argue that Japanese Swords are bulk nano materials, with structure controlled on the ‘nano’ level, for metallurgists this is just routine stuff.

Edo period Forge Scene

Edo period Forge Scene

Of course Japanese swords are not true examples of nanotechnology, despite the validity of the maths the folding doesn’t really result in a controlled structure on the nanoscale due to the changes that occur during the welding process… I plan to talk more about that in a later post.

As you can see below, the laminations are typically visible on the millimetre scale.

Lamination on Japanese Sword

Lamination on Japanese Sword