The Independent – sanctimonious hypocrites or satirical half-wits?

Questions to which the answer is no

Questions to which the answer is no

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Shear Relief

I’m very happy that my paper was accepted for publication in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A. It took a long time from performing the experiment to presenting the results, mainly because I needed to repeat the analysis which was something I wasn’t able to make time for until I had to submit the thesis.

Surface relief caused by shear transformation of bainite

Surface relief caused by shear transformation of bainite

In the paper atomic force microscopy is used to measure the shear component of extremely thin plates of bainitic ferrite in superbainite. The shear component is surprisingly large compared to the value we expected of 0.23–0.28 based on previous experiments carried out after transformation at higher temperatures (such as the results by Swallow and Bhadeshia).

It seems like the higher strain may help to explain why the bainitic ferrite plates are so thin and slender. It would now be really interesting to test if that is true or not, which is something I couldn’t really do by looking at the TEM and SEM images I have already.

More details on my web-page at Mathew Peet| Papers| Surface Relief Due to Bainite Transformation at 200°C

Article is currently available electronically by using DOI

New Podcasts

I made three new podcasts with Prof. Harry Bhadeshia on his latest papers on transformation texture, the new delta-Trip steels and on prediction of Hot Strength of ferritic steels.

The work on transformation texture is from Saurabh Kundu’s thesis were Patel and Cohen’s model has been shown to correctly predict the orientation relationship between ferrite and austenite after martensitic transformation. It’s shown that variants are selected by free energy differences that can be calculated depending on the orientation.

The delta-Trip steels were developed as a result of the prediction of neural networks, were after the neural network was made computer optimisation was used to try and maximise the mechanical properties. This work was done with Saurabh Chatterjee in collaboration with Murugananth Marimuthu. Both Saurabh Kundu and Saurabh Chatterjee completed their PhD’s at Cambridge while visiting from Tata Steel, Murugananth Marimuthu is a previous member of the phase transformations group, and has now also joined Tata Steel’s research and development section.

The work on Hot Strength of ferritic steels is the part of Radu Dmitriu’s topic of research. A neural network model of the hot-strength of ferritic steels. It was observed from the neural network that the strength is expected to suddenly start to decrease at 800 Kelvin, which can has been explained to be due to changes in the mobility of dislocations.

Addendum

According to wordpress documentation these links should get added to the rss feed of this bainite blog as enclosures.

Podcast: Hot Strength

Podcast: Delta Ferrite

Podcast: Transformation Texture

Subcribing to RSS Feed of this webpage should get you all the podcasts, or for Podcasts Only
Subscibe to RSS Feed for posts I remember to add to Podcasts category

Accessing Papers from University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge news feed had notified about the new use of Raven Passwords to access electronic resources.

The ATHENS system of controlling access to networked services has been centrally funded as a national service for many years. That funding is being withdrawn by the JISC in favour of national Federated Access Control based on local user login.

ATHENS handles around 3 million users and 250 online services but it is a purely UK solution to providing access to remote services. The JISC have established that a
Federated solution using open source software and international standards will lead to a Single Sign On system with an individual using their institutional login to use both national and local services. This will also tie in with strategies for e-learning and e-science.

Raven is the web authentication system administered by University of Cambridge Computing Service.