LIberal Doublespeak – paying more is paying less

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11946112

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-11947701

Liberal democrats are claiming that students who will pay more for their education in the future will be paying less.

Their argument seems to be that the longer you delay paying back a loan, and the slower you pay it back the better.

I’m a bit worried that politicians can make this argument so easily, I think this is the same way they think about borrowing on the national scale. At least on the national scale one thing they often seem to forget is that the cost of borrowing can change.

I think it is very disingenuous to claim that richer students will pay more for their loans because they will pay them back sooner. Also does this mean no one will have a choice but to borrow to pay for their education, will it be compulsory to take loans from the government, or will students be allowed to pay upfront if they have the money? Paddy Ashdown seemed to claim that no one will pay for their education (only pay it back later).

Did we enter the world of double speak?

If anyone knows where I can read the proposals for this legislation please let me know. Mr Ashdown suggested we should read, but didn’t say where.

Advertisements

MIT OpenCourseWare

I was impressed to see the systematic release of coursework into the public domain by MIT. A large amount of course material, lecture notes, exam questions and answers has been made available with a creative commons license and it available to take and modify for non-commercial uses [please check license issues yourself if you intend to do this]. The material covers many subject areas and a total of 1800 courses.

MIT OpenCourseWare

Accessing Papers from University of Cambridge

The University of Cambridge news feed had notified about the new use of Raven Passwords to access electronic resources.

The ATHENS system of controlling access to networked services has been centrally funded as a national service for many years. That funding is being withdrawn by the JISC in favour of national Federated Access Control based on local user login.

ATHENS handles around 3 million users and 250 online services but it is a purely UK solution to providing access to remote services. The JISC have established that a
Federated solution using open source software and international standards will lead to a Single Sign On system with an individual using their institutional login to use both national and local services. This will also tie in with strategies for e-learning and e-science.

Raven is the web authentication system administered by University of Cambridge Computing Service.